I’m making sourdough with my vaginal yeast

This is fascinating – can’t wait to see how the bread turns out

Another angry woman

Content warning: This post discusses food and contains embedded tweets containing misogynistic and disablist language.

I am making sourdough. I started the starter on Saturday afternoon, and it’s reached the point where it smells kind of yeasty, and now it’s looking like this:

IMAG0617

It’s caused quite a lot of visceral horror, because I bunged something a little bit unconventional in the starter: yeast from my vagina. Here’s my recipe, so you know:

Ingredients:

1 small Greek coffee-sized cup of plain flour
1/2 small Greek coffee-sized cup of water
As much vaginal yeast as I could scrape off a dildo I put in my vagina–my estimate is that there was about as much of it as would lightly coat a single tine of a fork, and no more.

Method: 

  • Mix the ingredients together.
  • Cover in foil, leave
  • The next day, “feed” it 1 small Greek coffee-sized cup of flour, 1/2 small Greek…

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The Smell of Bullshit, part 68: Why You Should Join A Union

Stronger Unions have done a post listing 8 surprising facts about trade union membership. The post quotes a report from the National Office of Statistics, which is worth a read if you’ve got a bit more time. Meanwhile, the 8 facts are

1. There are 6.4 million trade union members in the UK

That’s 25% of all employees. It’s down from previous decades, but it’s still a huge number and makes trade unions Britain’s biggest social movement.

2. There are more and more private sector union members

For the fourth year in a row, the levels of union members in the private sector has increased. There are 200,000 more since 2010. The numbers are still far too low (14% of the private sector is unionised, compared to 54% for the public sector), but it’s great to see progress being made. It’s definitive proof of the value of organising.

3. Private sector union members earn 8% more than non-members

The average hourly wage for non-unionised workers in the private sector is £12.64. For union members, it’s £13.67. The “union premium” is even bigger for young workers from ages 16 -24, who earn 39% more than their non-unionised colleagues (that’s £7.84 to £10.18).

4. Public sector union members earn more too

21% more. Not all of that can be put down to being a union member, but it’s clear that a union does deliver on fairer, better pay for its members – in the private or public sector. Being a union member also gives you a say on what happens in your workplace.

5. Women who are in a union earn 30% more

The wages of women union members are on average 30% higher than those of non-unionised women.

6. And women make up the majority of union members

For the 13th year in a row, women are more likely to be trade union members than men.  55% of union members are women. This somewhat dispels the myth that unions have male-dominated memberships, especially considering that women form a minority of the workforce.

7. The highest rates of union membership are among black workers

The proportion of employees who are union members was highest among “Black or Black British” workers . Union are often described as “male and pale” – but the latest figures dispel that.

8. 40% of UK employees work in a workplace with a union, but only 25% are union members

The figures show that there are significant number of workers who we can reach easily because the already work where a union is present. This is a massive opportunity. The benefits for union members are clear, and the government’s attacks on trade unions only show that they still fear the impact of organised workers demanding fair pay, proper rights, and a decent society.

Why not join your appropriate union today?