What My Bike Has Taught Me About White Privilege

Originally posted on A Little More Sauce:

The phrase “white privilege” is one that rubs a lot of white people the wrong way. It can trigger something in them that shuts down conversation or at least makes them very defensive. (Especially those who grew up relatively less privileged than other folks around them). And I’ve seen more than once where this happens and the next move in the conversation is for the person who brought up white privilege to say, “The reason you’re getting defensive is because you’re feeling the discomfort of having your privilege exposed.”

I’m sure that’s true sometimes. And I’m sure there are a lot of people, white and otherwise, who can attest to a kind of a-ha moment or paradigm shift where they “got” what privilege means and they did realize they had been getting defensive because they were uncomfortable at having their privilege exposed. But I would guess that more often than…

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Fringe Reviews 2014: Pam Ayres

First show of the year for me was Pam Ayres at the Assembly Rooms. For those of you who are under 40, Pam Ayres won Opportunity Knocks (a 70s Britain’s Got Talent) with her comedy poetry. Since then she’s had a successful career as a poet, writer, songwriter and presenter. Her poems are generally about everyday life and they seem quite simple although really they’re very clever.

This show is a mixture of Pam sharing anecdotes, reading passages from her autobiography and reciting her poems. She had the audience in stitches with her description of how the teenage Pam tried so hard to look like Dusty Springfield, in yellow lipstick.

There’s not much to say about it really – it’s warm and funny and I enjoyed every minute of it.

Guest post- “The public have no right to know”: how the Morning Star threatened to sack me for reporting domestic violence allegations

Originally posted on Another angry woman:

This is a guest post by Rory McKinnon. Content warning for domestic violence. It is published with permission of the survivor.

My name’s Rory MacKinnon, and I’ve been a reporter for the Morning Star for three years now. It’s given me a lot of pride to see how readers and supporters believe so strongly in the paper, from donating what cash they can to hawking it in the streets on miserable Saturdayafternoons. I was proud to represent a “broad paper of the left”, as my editor Richard Bagley always put it: a paper that saw feminism, LGBTQ issues, racial politics and the like as integral to its coverage of class struggle.

It’s for this reason that I thought I would have my editor’s support in following up domestic violence allegations against the Rail, Maritime and Transport union’s assistant general secretary Steve Hedley. Instead the Morning Star’s management threatened me…

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Commonwealth Games Glasgow 2014

I enjoyed the London 2012 Olympics so much, and I don’t think a month has gone by since then that I haven’t thought “I miss the Olympics.” So when the tickets for the Glasgow Commonwealth Games went on sale, I was keen to see as much as I could get tickets for (within what I could afford, which wasn’t as much as I would have liked).

The Big G

Sadly for me, I couldn’t get tickets for the diving, which is a) my favourite and b) being held less than a ten-minute walk away from where I live. We couldn’t get track cycling either, but we did get one session of badminton, one session of athletics and one session of netball. Then one of my cousins who lives a couple of hundred miles away let me know they had decided not to attend, and she sent me all her tickets to dispose of. I used one set of athletics tickets, sold another set (and gave the money to my cousin) and I still have a pair of badminton tickets for Friday, if anyone wants them.

On Saturday we went to the badminton at the Emirates Arena. Before it started we amused ourselves by trying to name the countries represented by all the flags around the venue; we did better once we realised they were in alphabetical order.

Badminton Commonwealth Nations Flags

I’ve never played or watched badminton, and know next to nothing about it, but I enjoyed every minute of it. There were four courts active during the session, and it’s pretty difficult to concentrate on four matches at once. We were a bit too far away to comfortably watch the Scotland games, so I concentrated on watching the country of my birth.

Badminton, 26/07/14

Badminton, 26/07/14

We were watching a mixed team session. Each country had to win the best of five games, made up of a mixed doubles game, a solo men’s game, a solo women’s game, a men’s doubles game and a women’s doubles games. As soon as a team has won three of the five games, their session is over, so if a country won its first three games, it wouldn’t have to play the other two, or it might go to four or the full five games. Singapore got through, and although Scotland put up a very strong fight, they weren’t good enough to beat eventual champions Malaysia.

Malaysia v Scotland

Badminton played at this level is incredibly fast, and the players are astonishingly agile and athletic. It was a great evening.

Monday was a long day. We had our own athletics tickets for the morning session, and my cousin’s tickets for the evening session. We spent the time in between eating a somewhat pathetic picnic scraped together from what was left in the big ASDA at Hampden, and sunbathing. (Dear ASDA, if you are the only supermarket near to a venue which is hosting major sporting events all day, please order a lot more sandwiches than you usually do, and keep restocking them through the day. Kthnxbye).

Our seats for both sessions were more or less behind the hammer-throwing cage so we had an excellent view of the hammer and discus events. I must admit, if I was watching athletics on the telly and hammer throwing came on, I’d probably stop paying attention, but watching it live was compelling. One of the nicest things about the Commonwealth Games is that the para sport is on at the same time as the mainstream sport. I know people think that it would be too difficult to do for the Olympics because it would just be too big, but for the Commonwealth Games, it works really well.

One of the things I most enjoyed on Monday was a men’s para discus final. I think it was T42-44 – it was for athletes with lower limb amputations. Most of the competitors wore prosthetic legs but Richard Okigbazi managed to balance on one leg and still get enough oomph to win bronze. I don’t want to sound like one of those “oh, the para athletes are so inspiring” wankers, but seeing someone manage to throw a discus on one leg was one of the most incredible sporting things I’ve ever seen.

Richard OkigbaziRichard Okigbazi throwing for bronzeOne of the nicest things was how generous and appreciative the crowd were. Obviously the UK nations got the most support, but the whole crowd were genuinely cheering for other nations too – not in that “we’re clapping politely because we have to” sort of way, but with genuine pleasure at seeing people do well. The decathlon was going on throughout the day, at the other end of the stadium from where we were, and the crowd was cheering for everyone who managed to get over the bar in the high jump. There was a real sense of joy and delight at seeing athletes doing well and achieving new – er, achievements. Biggest cheer of the day was for Scot Libby Clegg who got gold in women’s para 100m, but pretty much everything was greeted with huge applause, and standing ovations for every gold winner’s lap of honour, as well as for the silver/bronze medal winners who walked around the track, and, really, for any athlete who had completed their event and walked around the edge of the stadium. Lots of the athletes stopped to high-five kids and give autographs, and not just the winners, the losing competitors too. Monday was a very long day – we left the flat just before 8am and didn’t get back until just before 1am on Tuesday. Of course, that didn’t stop the cat waking us up and demanding food at 6am. Even though there was food in his bowl.

Yesterday we went to the SECC to watch the netball. I hated all sport at school but once I left school and started 6th form I played netball for a local league. We weren’t great but we enjoyed it. I was thinking about getting back into it until I knackered my hip – it’d be too high impact for me now. I’ve only ever played at a very basic level, and I was even struggling to remember all the rules. Watching it played at this level was an education in what sport can be like when people are really really good at it. We saw South Africa v Wales (Wales got gubbed)

South Africa v Walesand Malawi v Scotland (Scotland got gubbed).

Malawi v ScotlandI really enjoyed watching people play with competence and some idea what they were doing. I could see clearly how the Malawi (in particular) were able to anticipate, and position themselves so as to make space and create opportunities. Netball at this level is fast and skilful, and deserves more respect than it usually gets. The Malawi goal shooter, I think her name is Mwayi Kumwenda, was particularly good.

Unfortunately, that was the last of our Commonwealth Games trips. I feel quite sad we won’t be there to see any more, though to be honest I’m knackered and glad of a few lazy days before I go back to work next week.

From what I’ve seen, the Games are very well organised. They’ve clearly thought hard and put a lot of work into the public transport arrangements, and it worked very smoothly for the three venues we attended. Security checks were quick and thorough – airport-style screening machines, but the armed forces personnel doing the screening were much friendlier and pleasanter than any airport security staff I’ve ever dealt with. All of the volunteers we saw or spoke to were friendly, polite and eager to help, as were the train and station staff. My one gripe, and it’s a pretty big one, was the venue food. At the Emirates, I bought a cheese ploughman’s sandwich, nothing special, just a triangular packet of cheese sandwich with pickle and a bit of tomato, for £4, and a ham and cheese for £4.50, plus a bottle of water, a bottle of Irn Bru, two muffins and two caramel logs. Total? £19.40. That was the last vegetarian sandwich they had, so if we’d been any later, I’d have been going hungry. At Hampden, there was a choice of fried food, fried food, extortionately-priced anaemic falafel wraps, £1 pieces of fruit, £2 bars of chocolate, pies or fried food. We gave up at the SECC and took sandwiches. Scotland has a huge problem with dietary related ill-health, and lack of exercise ill-health. If they’re hoping that the legacy of the Games will be better health in Scotland they could at least have tried to set an example with cheaper, healthier food. The pricey, unhealthy food is the one thing I think they’ve really got wrong with this Games (well, that and the embarrassing opening ceremony). Even the lowest-achieving athlete here would baulk at a meal of potato wedges and a £2 giant Twix washed down with fizzy mango juice – why should spectators be fobbed off with that? They could have put a bit of thought into it and showcased cheap, tasty, healthy food from all the Commonwealth countries – it would have been much more inspirational than pies and burgers, even if they did have haggis in them.

On the whole though, we had an amazing 3 days at the Games. If I had more money I’d have loved to have gone to more sessions of any number of different sports. As it is, I’ll be spending the rest of the week glued to the telly to watch the diving! Well done Glasgow – and if any of the volunteers/transport staff/police etc see this post, thank you so much for the hard work you have put into the Games – we really do appreciate it.

Rewards and punishment for hiring those unlike oneself

Originally posted on Feminist Philosophers:

When women advocated for other women, they were seen as colder, and when people of color advocated for people like them, they were seen as less competent. “People are perceived as selfish when they advocate for someone who looks like them, unless they’re a white man,” said David Hekman, one of the study’s authors.

For more, go here.

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A Tale of Three Overtakes

Originally posted on Helen Blackman:

I’m very fortunate with my current commute. It’s short, it’s on fairly quiet country roads and there’s so little congestion that there are no traffic lights. However, as any reasonably experienced person who travels by bike will know, there will always be flashpoints. The main two to watch for are risky overtaking and junctions (and that lovely overlapping set, risky overtaking at junctions).

Overtaking seems to spark vociferous debate as there is a clash between cyclists’ need to remain safe versus drivers’ need to get somewhere in a hurry. You would hope that, for the sake of basic humanity, safety would win but generally it doesn’t. As justification for their impatience, many non-cycling drivers just resort to a “why are you on the road” attitude as justification for their own, at best reckless, behaviour. But the other morning I encountered, in quick succession, three different types of overtaking behaviour that…

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Dinner with No Voters or “What I wanted to say before the Pudding hit the fan”

Originally posted on :

10325374_842844915744161_1747748988925750116_nThis from Peter Arnott works as a part response to this conflict-averse piece by Madeleine Bunting (check the weird ethnic civic framing).

One thing that almost all of my friends who tell me they intend to vote No in September have in common is that they wish that this referendum campaign had never happened. They don’t see the need for it. They think it is needlessly sowing doubt, division and uncertainty at a time when nobody really wanted the debate to happen. They wish the whole damn thing would go away and be forgotten.

I have a certain amount of sympathy with that. I am sure Alex Salmond does too. After all, he didn’t expect the Labour Party in Great Britain and in Scotland to collapse quite so comprehensively as they did in 2010 and 2011, and thus make possible the election of a majority SNP administration at Holyrood that…

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